Good Navigation

We are in Michigan today and we’ve had an awesome weekend of skiing over this long holiday weekend. I’ve really come to love this ski resort called Boyne Highlands.

However, while I was going down one of the runs earlier, I got confused about which direction I should go.

There are different “levels” of ski runs that u can go down depending on your experience level…

* There’s the bunny hill which I definitely prefer to be avoid.

* Green runs are easy, they are the kind of runs the are enjoyable for the first couple of runs that I go on… you know, to get familiar with the conditions, make sure my boots aren’t on too tight or too loose.

* Blue runs are ranked “difficult” and “more difficult”. These are my favorite runs. I usually stay on these for the better part of the day.

* Black diamonds are the most difficult and you won’t see me on one of these runs until the end of the day.

* Double black diamonds are for experts only. You probably won’t ever catch me on one of these. Unless I’ve gotten lost… which is almost what happened.

Anyways, on my way down our first hill, I was inspired to write a post about signs and navigation. Here is why:

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Notice how the two pictures are showing you how to get to Mac Gully… an easy run, then a little further down the hill you see a sign to continue on Mac Gully but supposedly turns into a double black diamond!

Actually this sign was letting you know that Mac Gully was to your right as well as an entrance to another run that actually was a double black.

Why in the world would anyone running a ski resort want their visitors to get confused, lost, or have to stop in the middle of a run to try and find a way to go?

Then I got to thinking about website navigation. This week I am planning on doing some serious research on best practices for site navigation and where to place certain buttons,nav bars, search forms, etc. to make everything on your site to be as easy to find as possible.